Malin Fabbri

Malin Fabbri

Malin Fabbri is the editor of AlternativePhotography.com, author of several books on alternative photographic processes, and experiments with a variety of techniques such as anthotypes, cyanotypes, photopolymer gravure, chlorophyll prints, photosynthesis, pinholes and solargraphs.
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Shows: Anthotypes, cyanotypes, photopolymer gravure, photosynthesis, pinholes and solargraphs.


Malin Fabbri grew up in Sweden, and in her early twenties moved to London to study. She earned an M.A. in Design at Central St. Martin’s School of Design, but publishing her thesis felt more like a beginning than an end. Malin decided to combine her academic and practical experience and started AlternativePhotography.com in 2000. The website still maintains its origins as a source of information and research for alternative photographic processes and represents almost 400 artists. Malin actively manages the expansion of the site as editor. She researches alternative photographic processes, makes her own prints and runs workshops. Malin has also worked professionally with big media names like Time magazine and CNBC Europe. Malin is the co-author of From pinhole to print, the editor of the alternative photography art book Alternative Photography: Art and Artists, Edition I representing 115 artists working in alternative photographic processes, and the author of Blueprint to cyanotypes – Exploring a historical alternative photographic process,  a beginners book on cyanotypes, Anthotypes – Explore the darkroom in your garden and make photographs using plants, which is the only book dedicated to the anthotype process, Anthotype Emulsions, Volume 1 and Volume 2 – The collective research from photographers on World Anthotype Day 2022 and 2023 which contains the anthotype research of 200+ artists. World Anthotype Day is a global event where artists collectively research anthotype emulsions also an initiative started by Malin. Malin Fabbri has a strong interest in all alternative processes. She now lives and works in Stockholm, Sweden with her two sons, Maximillian and Ruben.

“As the editor of Alternative Photography.com, cyanotype is a natural choice, since it is a great teaching tool and a means of expressing creativity. Other processes I favor working in are anthotypes, photo polymer and gum bichromates.”

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Recommended reading - Learn more about Cyanotypes
Blueprint to cyanotypes the book by Malin Fabbri
Buy directly from the author

Blueprint to cyanotypes - Exploring a historical alternative photographic process

by Malin Fabbri and Gary Fabbri

9 of 10   Rated 9,46 - based on 182 votes

All you need to get started with cyanotypes, full of information, tips and samples from artists. An excellent beginners' guide to cyanotypes!
 
Get the notebook
Cyanotype Notes - Document your cyanotype process
Buy directly from us

Cyanotype notes – Document your cyanotype process

50 pre-defined pages for you to document your cyanotype process.
 
Anna Atkins tribute calendar
Anna Atkins calendar undated

Anna Atkins tribute calendar

12 beautiful cyanotypes by 12 different artists created in honour of Anna Atkins.
 
Anna Atkins tribute journal
Anna Atkins tribute journal undated

Anna Atkins tribute journal

Daily planner featuring 60 beautiful cyanotypes by different cyanotype artists created in honour of Anna Atkins.
 
Anna Atkins tribute planner
Anna Atkins tribute planner

Anna Atkins tribute planner

Yearly wall planner in A0, A1 and A2 size, featuring 60 beautiful cyanotypes.
 
Recommended reading - Learn more in the Anthotype books
Anthotypes – Explore the darkroom in your garden and make photographs using plants
Buy directly from us

Anthotypes – Explore the darkroom in your garden and make photographs using plants

by Malin Fabbri

9 of 10   Rated 9,8 - based on 224 votes

Make prints using plants - an environmentally safe process!
The most comprehensive resource on Anthotypes.
 
From World Anthotype Day 2022 and 2023
Anthotype Emulsions, Volume 2 – The collective research from photographers on World Anthotype Day 2023
Buy directly from us

Anthotype Emulsions, Volume 2 – The collective research from photographers on World Anthotype Day 2023

by Malin Fabbri

Anthotype research from almost 140 artists from all over the globe on 100 different plants, powders and dyes for anthotypes!
 

Anthotype Emulsions, Volume 1 – The collective research from photographers on World Anthotype Day 2022
Buy directly from us

Anthotype Emulsions, Volume 1 – The collective research from photographers on World Anthotype Day 2022

by Malin Fabbri

Anthotype research from over 100 artists from all over the globe on 60 different plants, powders and dyes for anthotypes!
 
Anthotype Notebook
Anthotype notebook
Buy directly from us

Anthotype notes – Document your anthotype process

Notebook by Malin Fabbri

10 of 10   Rated 10 - based on 2 votes

50 pre-defined pages for you to document your anthotype process.
 
 
 
Recommended reading on Photopolymer, gravure, solarplates and printmaking
Polymer Photogravure: A Step-by-Step Manual, Highlighting Artists and Their Creative Practice by Clay Harmon

Polymer Photogravure: A Step-by-Step Manual, Highlighting Artists and Their Creative Practice

by Clay Harmon

Clear and easy-to-understand instructions.
 

Printmaking in the Sun

Printmaking in the Sun

by Dan Welden and Pauline Muir

Covering the solarprint, or the photopolymer process, an inspiring read!
 

Copper Plate Photogravure – Demystifying the Process

Copper Plate Photogravure – Demystifying the Process

by David Morrish and Marlene MacCallum

Step-by-step basic printing procedures for a photogravure plate, complete with trouble shooting information.
 

The Complete Printmaker

The Complete Printmaker

by John Ross, Jim Ross, Tim Ross

Step by step through the history and techniques of over forty-five print-making methods.
 

4 thoughts on “Malin Fabbri”

  1. Hello,
    I just came upon your work and it is so inspiring! I’m looking forward to diving into the many layers. In the meantime, I’ve researched using Brugmansia to make natural dyes, pigments, or alternative processes in general but come up pretty empty-handed, possibly due to the potentially lethal character of the plant?!

    If ever you have any insights I’m all ears!
    Thanks very much,
    Hillary

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